Archive for the ‘Nursing’ Category


you brought your kitty with you.

September 13, 2016

I had a patient who was CMO and quite obviously very close to dying. The week before, my best buddy-cat Pippin had died (and I was pretty broken up about it, still). That being said… I walked into her room, and she said, “Oh, you brought your kitty with you!” I blink at her and say, “What?” Mind you, this was the first time I’d had that patient and I hadn’t discussed my cat with her, having cats or even liking them. Her reply, “Your kitty. It’s right by your foot.” I get that frisson, that momentary shiver in my soul and ask, just for kicks, “Yeah? What color’s the kitty?” She says, “Black with some white.”

Pippin was a black tuxedo cat with white paws and a white bib. And the patient died that night.


Satana calling for help.

September 13, 2016

Psychiatric RN here. Absolutely.

My first job was in a small, 35 bed psych hospital in California. It used to be a medical facility where surgeries were performed and, of course, people died.

A couple stories here. First off, when I’d work night shift, I’d sometimes get a phone call from the local police station asking if everything was okay. Sure, everything was fine. All the patients are asleep and it was just a normal night. The police then said that they received a 911 call from our hospital and the extension from where the call was being made was the arts and crafts room (NOBODY goes in there at night, not even staff. It’s always had a creepy vibe and used to be where surgeries were performed). The caller, identifying herself as Satana, was asking for help.

This would happen about once a month or so. Night shift didn’t have much staff, so as supervisor, I knew where all my staff was because I would be the one to help relieve them during breaks. I know with 100% certainty that no staff or patients were the ones calling 911. I know it wasn’t a patient because psych hospital doors are locked and to get to that room, a patient would have to cross 3 barriers of passcode protected doors.

Creepy, right?

At other times, our PA system would turn on randomly, usually after 10PM, and you’d hear breathing and beeping machines (none of our equipment beeped). One time in particular, the PA turned on and you could hear what sounded like a kid speaking but the content of what was said couldn’t be made out. Then it stopped. Then started again and then you could hear what sounded like an outgoing call playing through the PA. This was impossible to do because to activate the PA, you pick up a phone and dial 77. Once you do that, you lose a dial tone and cannot make an outbound call. So anyhow, the PA played an outgoing call for hours, yet not a single phone was ringing in the hospital so we weren’t sure what was happening, let alone how.

It finally stopped around 6AM and our patients were pissed. Imagine trying to fall asleep to that. To this day, nobody knew how that happened and the technician we called out at the time thought we were pranking him.


the 1970s styled grim reaper.

September 13, 2016

Intensive care nurse here: I have many stories ranging from sheets being ripped apart, to old women in rocking chairs, but the one which ‘haunts’ me is the time I think I actual saw the grim reaper. It was 1999 late in the day, it was summer and turning dark in a busy 12 bedded ITU, in London. I was in charge and at the nurses station, there were a few people milling around, but less than during the day. I looked up to see this man opening and coming through the double doors into the unit. What was so striking about him were his clothes. He looked like he had been picked straight out of 1974 and dropped in 1999. He was wearing brown cord flares, the platform shoes men wore then an orange, yellow and brown check shirt with a cream and brown patterned tank top, over the shirt. He was white with shortish brown hair (not quite 1970’s) and about 30 years old. He walked calmly (like he did this all the time) towards a bay of patients. Not recognising him and knowing he wasn’t a relative of other health care person, I said ‘Hello, can I help?’ He looked at me directly, nodded as if to say ‘Hello’ and carried on walking. I watched him and he stopped at the end of a patients bed and turned to look at them. He never touched the person or do anything other than look at them. This unwell, but stable patient suddenly and unexpectedly deteriorated. As the staff went to assist they all acted like they didn’t see him. He turned round and as calmly as he came in he left. I never saw what direction he went as I left the nurses station to go and help with the patient, who ultimately despite our best efforts died. I spoke to the some of the staff later on about our 1970’s visitor and no-one else saw him. 17 years later it is vivid in my mind.


She Dead.

January 25, 2016

I had a patient one night who was mentally disabled. She was a young, dark-skinned black woman with these huge eyes. I don’t know if she always looked like that or if she was just genuinely spooked, but they were open wide. The first thing she said to me when I walked in the room was “She dead. That lady dead”, nodding her head at the woman in the next bed. The woman in the next bed had apparently been dealing with this all day and was fed up. “I’m not dead!”, she yelled. I tried to calm her down, to no avail. The day shift nurse told me she’d been doing that all day. I felt so bad for her roomate. I considered trying to transfer her, but that would just put someone else in the room to put up with it. She did this all night. She would even put her call light on to tell me her roommate was dead.

So this was creepy on its own, but guess who died the next day? It wasn’t an expected death either. I don’t believe in the supernatural, but damn, that was quite a coincidence.


May 14, 2014

This one is from a friend– she swears it’s true.

Her dad is a hospice nurse. He got a call from the agency that a patient was in the process of dying and was expected to pass very soon. They asked that he attend to the family. Apparently the nurse who was supposed to be there could not make it for some reason. He complained that it was all the way across town, and it was not his usual day to work, but he went anyway. When he was nearly there the agency called him to say the family had reported that the patient had passed but to please go there and help with family support and start postmortum care. When he arrived he introduced himself by saying “Hello I’m Marty, I’m from Hospice.” My friend said the family’s mouths fell open and the all looked shocked. He apologized that their usual nurse could not make it. They said, “No that’s not it. Grandma kept mumbling that Marty was coming. We thought she was just talking nonsense but here you are!”

– Posted by ; Allnurses


The Elevator

May 14, 2014

Another time I was at the nurse’s station and we heard the bell in the elevator ringing. Someone was yelling “Help!” and we heard pounding. We called security to tell them someone was stuck in the elevator. I then walked over to the elevator doors and was shouting to the person to try to stay calm and help was on the way. She just kept yelling for help, banging, and ringing the bell. Security called the nurses station to say all of the elevators were working and they didn’t find anyone stuck. At this moment, whoever was in the elevator was suddenly quiet.

A few times I have been on the elevator and for no reason it went to the 5th floor. The 5th floor is totally unoccupied, but used to be a hospice unit. I would be going up from the ground floor and the only button lit up would be 3. But the elevator would pass my floor, go to 5th, open the door…. no one there. I never was brave enough to step foot onto the 5th floor.

– Posted by Clovery ; Allnurses


Please don’t cry, we’re all okay.

June 25, 2012

I work in a hospital, and in a place where death is common, I kind of learned how to just shrug things off and move on. This is different, and kind of both creeps me out, and brings tears to my eyes.

A cardiologist at our hospital died a couple of weeks ago. His house caught on fire. His wife, along with their 2 children also died during the accident. All four of them were found in the bedroom hugging each other.

There’s this kid, 7 years old, his doctor was a pediatrician at our hospital, been there a lot actually. The pediatrician was at a loss to with what to do with the kid. He was brought there by his mother, because the kid insisted he has been talking to his father a lot. His father died a couple years ago, and I’m not sure how or why. The pediatrician found nothing wrong with the kid.

A couple of days ago. the kid insisted on seeing his pediatric doctor, he didn’t say why, but was persistent. He kept bugging his mom to bring him to the doctor immediately. End of the day, she brings his kid to the hospital. Upon entering, the kid just stopped. In the lobby there was a photo of the deceased cardiologist, with flowers and well wishes. The kid sees it and tugs at his mom, “That’s the guy who talked to me a couple of days ago, he told me to tell [pediatric doctor] not to cry anymore, he said they’re all ok and happy.” So the mom takes the kid to his doctor, and the pediatric doctor is just, shocked and overwhelmed at the same time. The pediatric doctor was close friends with the cardiologist, and have been in a sad state these past couple of days.

The part that freaks me out is that the cardiologist never met the kid patient ever. I do believe that science can explain most things, but maybe not everything. If there was an “I see dead people kid” in real life, I’d bet that’s the kid.

– Posted by jorgensnap; Nosleep